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U.S. Electoral College - Compare and Contrast Essay Example

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U.S. Electoral College - Compare and Contrast

Each state has a number of electors equal to the number U. Representatives plus its (2) U. These electors then vote for President. The method of choosing the electors was remanded to the individual state legislatures thereby calming those states already distrustful of a centralized government.This understanding built upon an earlier compromise in the design of the Congress itself and thus satisfied both large and small states. The nation of thirteen states wanted to retain their own governmental powers and the prevalent thought of the time was that political parties were detrimental to liberty. These founders were of the opinion that men should not campaign for public office. ‘The office should seek the man. The man should not seek the office.’ In 1787, the country’s population was distributed along a thousand miles of Atlantic coastline that was hardly, if at all, connected by reliable communication or transportation. “How, then, to choose a president without political parties and national campaigns without upsetting the carefully designed balance between the presidency and the Congress on one hand and states and the federal government on the other?” (Kimberling, n. Elector’s votes were counted by the states legislative districts, the method favored by many of the Founders. As a result of this method, a state’s electoral votes were divided among two or more presidential candidates.Though most of the framers of the constitution would have objected, political parties began to rise to power during the 1830’s. Because of this, states began to use winner-take-all elections to choose presidential electors. In this system, the party that won a majority of the state is awarded all of that state’s electors. Political parties were of no consequence in the first presidential election of 1788. George Washington won the electoral vote unanimously, a reflection of his immense popularity. In the race for the second presidency, John Adams defeated Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson and his allies worked to organize the electorate and Jefferson was elected President four years later.

References

Gregg, Gary L. “Keep the College: Debunking Myths.” National Review [online]. November 7, 2001. National Review. March 13, 2006 <http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/comment-gregg110701.shtml>

Huckabee, David. “Memorandum: Presidential Election Returns by Congressional District 6, 23.” Congressional Research Service. 2000.

Katz, Ellis. “The American Electoral College.” International Information Programs. (n.d.). Temple University. March 13, 2006 <http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/politics/eleccol/katz.htm#back1>

Kimberling, William C. “The Electoral College.” FEC Office of Election Information. (n.d.). Federal Election Commission. March 13, 2006 <http://www.fec.gov/pdf/eleccoll.pdf>

Klinkner, Philip & McClellan, James. “Symposium – The Electoral College.” Insight on the News. December 18, 2000.

Richie, Rob & Hill, Steven. “Flunking College.” Tom Paine: Common Sense [online]. June 29, 2004. March 13, 2006 <http://www.tompaine.com/articles/flunking_college.php>

Ross, Tara. “The Electoral College: Enlightened Democracy.” Legal Memorandum #15. November 1, 2004. The Heritage Foundation. March 13, 2006 <http://www.heritage.org/Research/LegalIssues/lm15.cfm>

Schlesinger, Arthur. The Imperial Presidency. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 1973, pp. 483-84.

Whitaker, L. Paige & Neale, Thomas H. “The Electoral College:

An Overview and Analysis of Reform Proposals.” National Council for Science and the Environment. January 16, 2001.

preview essay on U.S. Electoral College - Compare and Contrast
  • Pages: 10 (2500 words)
  • Document Type: Essay
  • Subject: Politics
  • Level: Masters
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